Calculator

CDOT Revenue Sources

CDOT gets its funding from Colorado vehicle users.

With information on your personal Colorado vehicle use, Your CDOT Calculator will approximate how much you contribute annually in taxes and fees to support the transportation system you use.

It also shows how CDOT uses that revenue to maximize each dollar spent on the state’s highway system.

My Contribution to Colorado’s
Transportation System Funding Last Year

Enter your mileage and vehicle miles per gallon (mpg) to estimate how much you contribute annually in state and federal taxes and fees to Colorado’s transportation system.

How CDOT Spent My Dollars
 

How CDOT spent your dollars is outlined in the table and chart below. Click the blue text links to see details about each tax, fee and program.
Average number of gallons you purchase annually
Federal Fuel Tax Paid
State Fuel Tax Paid
Total Fuel Tax Paid
Total Federal and State Fuel Tax Paid to CDOT
FASTER Vehicle Registration Fees
FASTER Vehicle Registration Fees to CDOT
Total Annual Taxes & Fees Paid to CDOT
Monthly Taxes & Fees Paid to CDOT
Maintaining What We Have
Maximizing the Existing System
Expanding the System
Delivering Programs and Projects
Pass Through Funds/Multimodal Grants
Transportation Commission Contingency/Debt Service
Annual Revenue Invested by CDOT
 

Assumptions Your CDOT Calculator Makes:

  • You registered your vehicle on time.
  • You didn't rent a car in the state of Colorado.
  • Your vehicle weighs between 2,000 and 5,000 pounds.
  • You haven't purchased aviation fuel.
  • You weren't convicted of driving under the influence.
  • You don't have a motorcycle endorcement on your driver's license.

Federal Fuel Tax Paid

Federal fuel taxes are collected “at the rack,” meaning that distributors and refiners pay the tax during transactions. This analysis assumes that the price of the tax is passed on to you, the consumer, in the price/gallon.

You pay 18.4 cents in federal fuel tax for every gallon of regular gas and 24.4 cents for every gallon of diesel purchased in Colorado. Like with Colorado’s state fuel tax, the federal fuel tax is a flat tax, meaning it does not fluctuate with the price of gas or the rate of inflation.

Federal fuel taxes collected nationwide flow into the national Highway Trust Fund. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) distributes money among the U.S. states and territories based on a funding formula. These funds consist of reimbursements to states for dollars spent on transportation projects.

State Fuel Tax Paid

State fuel taxes are collected "at the rack," meaning that distributors and refiners pay the tax during transactions. This analysis assumes that the price of the tax is passed on to you, the consumer, in the price/gallon.

You pay 22 cents in state fuel tax for every gallon of regular gas and 20.5 cents for every gallon of diesel purchased in Colorado. Like with the federal fuel tax, the state fuel tax is a flat tax, meaning it does not fluctuate with the price of gas or the rate of inflation.

State fuel taxes go into the Colorado Highway Users Tax Fund (HUTF), administered by the Colorado State Treasurer. Based on a formula the State Treasurer uses, 2011 funds were dispensed in the following manner:

  • 53.9% goes to state highways (CDOT);
  • 19.8% goes to county roads;
  • 13.6% goes to city roads; and,
  • 12.7% goes to the Colorado State Patrol.

Total Fuel Tax Paid

Federal and state fuel taxes are collected "at the rack," meaning that distributors and refiners pay the tax during transactions. This analysis assumes that the price of the tax is passed on to you, the consumer, in the price/gallon.

CDOT has made some assumptions when making this calculation, including:

  • You registered your vehicle on time;
  • You didn't rent a car in the state of Colorado;
  • Your vehicle weighs between 2,000 and 5,000 lbs.;
  • You haven't purchased aviation fuel or gasohol;
  • You weren't convicted of driving under the influence, and;
  • You don't have a motorcycle endorsement on your driver's license.

The analysis omits annual legislative General Fund transfers to the Capital Construction Fund and disregards registration fee variation based on your county of residence.

Total Fuel Tax Paid to CDOT

The Highway Users Tax Fund (HUTF) is managed by the Colorado State Treasurer. CDOT receives 100 percent of federal fuel taxes paid in Colorado. In 2011, state fuel tax funds were dispensed by the State Treasurer as follows:

  • 53.9% went to state highways (CDOT);
  • 19.8% went to county roads;
  • 13.6% went to city roads; and,
  • 12.7% went to the Colorado State Patrol.

Vehicle Registration Fees

Senate Bill 09-108, the Funding Advancement for Surface Transportation and Economic Recovery (FASTER) Act, created new funding sources for CDOT beginning in 2010. FASTER fees are derived from the following sources:

  • A road safety surcharge and a bridge safety surcharge, each of which vary by vehicle weight and are collected through the same mechanism used for payment of registration fees and specific ownership taxes;
  • A daily fee for the use of a rented motor vehicle;
  • A supplemental oversize / overweight vehicle surcharge;
  • An increased fee for the late registration of a motor vehicle; and,
  • An increased unregistered vehicle fine.

Maintaining What We Have

This includes projects and work for the care of our existing system such as resurfacing and reconstruction of existing pavement and bridges, maintenance activities such as roadside and structure (bridge) maintenance and snow removal.

Maximizing the Existing System

Includes operational upgrades and improvements like travel information, electronic signs, projects that add safety upgrades like turn lanes and traffic safety education programs to increase seatbelt use or reduce impaired driving.

Expanding the System

Includes projects that add to our existing transportation system such as adding new lanes to highways.

Limited funding is available for this category of construction currently. However, the High Performance Transportation Enterprise (HPTE), which is dedicated to increasing highway capacity through innovative finance, is expected to play a role in filling the gap in this function in the future.

Pass Through Funds/Multimodal Grants

CDOT administers federal and state funds that are dedicated to local transportation agencies for highways, to the Division of Aeronautics for airports, to the Bicycle and Pedestrian Program, and to the Transit and Rail Program.

Delivering Programs and Projects

Spending in this category supports efficient, effective and sustainable management of CDOT programs, collaboration with local transportation agencies to plan for long-term changes in transportation demand and research into methods for innovative program delivery.

Transportation Commission Contingency/Debt Service

The Transportation Commission maintains a contingency fund budget to respond to unforeseen events, such as emergency projects and snow & ice overages, in addition to servicing debt.